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Cape sorrel

Oxalis pes-caprae

Bermuda buttercup, African wood-sorrel, Sourgrass, English weed, Lucky clover (Eng.), Geelsuring, Suring (Afr.)

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Cape sorrel are such a common weed in gardens that one rarely ever stop to notice it. As kids, we collected the flowers with stems intact and chewed on them for their pleasant sour taste. The yellow flowers light up in the sunlight and close at night to reopen again, once in the sun's rays. Cape sorrel is also very commonly used in Waterblommetjiebredie, a culinary dish in South Africa. Cape sorrel is clasified as an invasive species in South Africa and can be very difficult to eliminate if it's spread across a large area.

Planning

Difficulty
Easy
Flowering time
Winter, Spring
Fruiting time
Spring

Harvesting

When harvesting flowers and leaves, pick or cut as desired, preferably early morning.

Propagation

Rhizomes
Underground stems(stolons) and bulbs spread rapidly.
Cloves
Separate the bulbs and replant just under the surface of the soil in good, slightly sandy houseplant soil.

Special features

Geography

Origin
South Africa
Natural climate
Temperate to cold

Environment

Light
Full Sun
Soil moisture
Wet
Soil type
Loam
Soil PH preference
Acid
Frost hardiness
Hardy

Uses

Medicinal
Functions as an analgesic, antipyrectic, anti-inflammatory, depurative and scorpion anitdote.
Edible
With a pleasant sour flavours, cape sorrel is used in a popular South African dish, Waterblommetjie bredie.

Personality

Family
Oxalidaceae
Flower colour
Yellow
Scent
None

Problems

Generally pest free.

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