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Calendula

Calendula officinalis

English marigold, Common marigold, Garden marigold, Pot marigold, Scottish marigold (Eng.), Gousblom (Afr.)

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Calendulas are easy to grow herbaceous perennials that are treated as annuals. They will grow in a variety of soil types and need a lot of water. Both the leaves and flowers are edible and make a pleasant tea in small doses. The leaves can be added to salads, and taste either bitter or sweet. Calendulas also make great companion plants as they attract pollinators. A beautiful yellow natural dye is made from the flower petals. It is used culinary, medicinal and cosmetic.

Planning

Difficulty
Easy
Flowering time
Winter
Fruiting time
Winter, Spring

Harvesting

The flowers should be harvested when in bloom (Winter). Harvest flowers regularly to extend the flowering season.

Propagation

Seed
Sow seed in situ from end of Summer to Autumn, about 6 mm deep. Germination takes 7-14 days.

Special features

Crop rotation
Calendulas are light feeders and do not need a lot of nutrients.

Geography

Origin
Southern Europe, Mediterranean, and parts of Asia.
Natural climate
Cool to temperate

Environment

Light
Full Sun, Partial Sun
Soil moisture
Moist
Soil type
Chalk, Clay, Loam, Sand
Soil PH preference
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Frost hardiness
Hardy

Uses

Medicinal
Healing plant from Middle Ages times with anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties.
Edible
The leaves are sprinkled in salads, soups, caserols and pastas. Flowers have a peppery flavor, though some flowers can be more tangy or spicy, fresh. Also delicious in biscuits, cakes and muffins.
Notes
Culinary, medicinal, cosmetic

Personality

Family
Compositae
Flower colour
Bright yellow, orange, Orange
Scent
Mild

Problems

Not easily affected by pests or diseases.

Companion plants

Tomatoes

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